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Rheumatoid Arthritis: An Introduction

Story at-a-glance -

  • Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a debilitating disease that affects people of all ages.
  • According to the Arthritis Foundation, as many as 1.5 million people in the United States are affected by rheumatoid arthritis, with 41 out of 100,000 people being diagnosed with the disease annually.
 

Rheumatoid Arthritis: An Introduction

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Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is starting to cement itself as a debilitating disease that affects people of all ages.1 In fact, it’s now the third most common type of arthritis, in terms of incidence, behind osteoarthritis and gout.2

According to the Arthritis Foundation, as many as 1.5 million people in the United States are affected by rheumatoid arthritis, with 41 out of 100,000 people being diagnosed with the disease annually.

Women are three times more likely to have rheumatoid arthritis, commonly occurring between the ages of 30 and 60. Men are also prone to experiencing the disease, but at a later age in their lives.3

Rheumatoid arthritis accounts for 22 percent of deaths from arthritis and other rheumatic conditions in the U.S., as noted in a report entitled “Science has ARTHRITIS on the Run …”, written by Dr. Walter G. Barr and published by the Arthritis Foundation.4

Rheumatoid Arthritis Statistics Across the Globe

Globally, rheumatoid arthritis is said to affect 1 about percent of the population. While this seems like a small number, it’s not an amount that should be taken lightly, since in other countries, RA is already gaining ground.

In a report published in 2009, The Australian Institute of Health and Welfare Agency stated that around 400,000 Australians were diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis.5 That number rose slightly to 445,000 following self-reported estimates in 2011 to 2012.6

Meanwhile, information by Arthritis Research U.K. published in 2014 showed that around 400,000 adults in the U.K. already have rheumatoid arthritis, with 20,000 new patients being diagnosed every year.7

In 2016, Glenn Frey, co-founder and front man of the band The Eagles passed away at age 67 due to complications from rheumatoid arthritis, acute ulcerative colitis, and pneumonia. But what ultimately played a part in his untimely demise was the rheumatoid arthritis medication he was using.

Prevent Rheumatoid Arthritis From Affecting You Big Time

The thing about rheumatoid arthritis is that one can heal from it if the disease is treated immediately, but in Frey’s case, the medication that was supposed to help him heal didn’t work, but instead set him up for devastating effects.

This is why if you use or know someone who uses rheumatoid arthritis medications, it pays to be vigilant as common treatment protocols used for RA patients nowadays can pose health risks and lead to serious consequences.

Not all of the drugs in the market used to treat different diseases are as efficient and effective as they claim to be.

The good news is that an autoimmune disease like rheumatoid arthritis, and the pain that arises from it, can be treated naturally. Read this guide and get all the information you need to know about rheumatoid arthritis.

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What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis?

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