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Temperature Regulation for Thyroid Testing

January 02, 2008 | 65,705 views

Do you ever experience fatigue, depression, difficulty concentrating, difficulty getting up in the morning, cold hands and feet or intolerance to cold, constipation, loss of hair, fluid retention, dry skin, poor resistance to infection, high cholesterol, psoriasis, eczema, acne, premenstrual syndrome, loss of menstrual periods, painful or irregular menstrual periods, excessive menstrual bleeding, infertility (male or female), fibrocystic breast disease, or ovarian cysts? If so, you may have an underactive thyroid. It is often seen in people who suffer from multiple allergies, immune disorders and chronic fatigue.

Normal temperature regulation in the body is essential for enzyme functions and preservation of health. Whenever our molecular and immune defenses are stressed, three body organs take the brunt of the injury; the thyroid, pancreas and adrenal glands. The evaluation of the functional status of the thyroid gland -- hypothyroidism or under-active thyroid gland -- requires blood tests as well as temperature records.

There is considerable evidence, however, that blood tests fail to detect many cases of hypothyroidism (underactive thyroid). It appears that many individuals have "tissue resistance" to thyroid hormone. Therefore, their body may need more thyroid hormone, even though the amount in their blood is normal (or even on the high side of normal). A low axillary temperature suggests (but does not prove) hypothyroidism. Optimal temperature regulation is an essential aspect of holistic therapy for these disorders.

There is a simple way to test this. Simply follow the instructions below and bring your results to your next visit with the doctor.


1. Use any digital or mercury thermometer. Shake it down before going to bed to 96 degrees or less and put it by your bedside.

2. In the morning, as soon as you wake up, put the thermometer deep in your armpit for ten minutes and record the temperature. Do this before you get out of bed, have anything to eat or drink, or engage in any activity. This will measure your lowest temperature of the day, which correlates with thyroid gland function. The normal underarm temperature averages 97.8-98.2 degrees F. We frequently recommend treatment if the temperature averages 97.4 or less. The temperature should be taken for four days.

3. Each time you are taking your temperature, it is imperative that you take both axillary (underarm) and oral (mouth) temperatures. Both temperatures need to be taken upon waking up as well as three hours later and then six hours after that. It is important to do this for four days and to follow these instructions carefully in order to get accurate results.

4. For women, the temperature should be taken starting the second day of menstruation. The reason is because a considerable temperature rise may occur around the time of ovulation and give incorrect results. If you miss a day, that is okay, but be sure to finish the testing before ovulation. For men, and for postmenopausal women, it makes no difference when the temperatures are taken. However, do not do the test when you have an infection or any other condition which would raise your temperature.

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