Hide this
woman-headache

Story at-a-glance -

  • When you suffer from a head injury, calcium crystals (otoconia) in your otolith canal become dislodged and end up in the semicircular canal, causing benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV)
  • In some cases, you can get vertigo through a viral infection in your inner ear, resulting in either vestibular neuritis or labyrinthitis
 

How Do You Get Vertigo?

| 4,275 views

There are different ways you can get vertigo. The most common cause is a traumatic physical injury due to a workplace, sports or vehicular accident, but a viral infection and certain medications can induce this condition as well. The information below describes how these various situations can cause vertigo.

Head Injuries Can Cause Different Post-Traumatic Vertigo

When you suffer from a head injury, calcium crystals (otoconia) in your otolith canal become dislodged and end up in the semicircular canal, causing benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV).

As you move your head, the crystals disrupt the flow of fluid in the semicircular canal, sending jumbled signals to your brain that result in vertigo.1 In fact, 28 percent of head trauma cases usually develop BPPV.2

In other instances, post-traumatic Meniere's disease may develop, which is characterized by an abnormal buildup of fluid in your inner ear. How Meniere's disease develops is unknown, but it's theorized that a bleeding in your inner ear may cause a problem in the flow of fluids in the canals.3

If you had a particularly strong concussion, it can fracture your temporal bones located at the lateral and base of your skull, damaging your nerves that send signals to your brain. As a result, vertigo can occur, along with other symptoms such as facial paralysis, hearing loss, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak and meningitis.4

To diagnose for post-traumatic vertigo, you'll need to explain to your doctor how and when you got a concussion, and if you're experiencing any symptoms as a result of the injury. Afterwards, you'll have to take several tests to check for hearing and balance. The treatment for your vertigo will depend on the final diagnosis of your doctor.5

Vertigo May Be a Side Effect of Pharmaceutical Drugs

In a study published by the Journal of Pharmacology & Pharmacotherapeutics, the following medications have been found to induce vertigo as a side effect:6

Anticonvulsants

Anti-hypertensives

Antibiotics

Antidepressants

Antipsychotics

Anti-inflammatories

If you're currently taking any of these medications for a condition and have experienced vertigo in the past, it's recommended to discuss this with your doctor before an accident occurs.

Vertigo May Develop Because of a Viral Infection

In some cases, you can get vertigo through a viral infection in your inner ear, resulting in either vestibular neuritis or labyrinthitis. Vestibular neuritis is a condition where your vestibular nerve becomes inflamed. The nerve is responsible for controlling your balance by "sensing head position changes relative to gravity."7 If one vestibular nerve becomes inflamed, the information sent to your brain isn't synchronized with the other nerve, thus causing vertigo.8

Labyrinthitis is similar to vestibular to neuritis, wherein the vestibular nerve is inflamed with the inclusion of the cochlea nerve. As a result, not only do you have balance issues, but hearing issues as well.9 When a virus enters your inner ear, it can affect either your vestibular nerve, or the entire membranous labyrinth, hence the reason vestibular neuritis and labyrinthitis are closely related. The table below lists the possible viruses that can infect your inner ear:10

Herpes

Influenza

Measles

Rubella

Mumps

Polio

Hepatitis

Epstein-Barr

Similar to post-traumatic vertigo, the treatment for viral vertigo will depend on what kind of virus infects your inner ear. If you develop any symptoms associated with the illnesses listed above, along with vertigo, consult your doctor immediately for treatment. A sudden onset of dizziness while performing day-to-day tasks may result in a serious injury.

Previous

What is Vertigo?

Next

Vertigo Duration

Click Here and be the first to comment on this article

Thank you! Your purchases help us support these charities and organizations.