Croup: Be Concerned if This Cough Bothers Someone You Know

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Story at-a-glance

  • Croup is mainly characterized by an infection of the child’s larynx (voice box) and trachea (windpipe), which are the upper and lower parts of the breathing tube connecting the mouth to the top of the lungs
  • Croup is highly contagious. It can spread from one person to another, usually between an infected child to another child or adult
  • Learn how to help relieve croup in a child safely and naturally, plus ideal ways to prevent this condition

As parents or guardians, taking precautions and making sure your child remains healthy and pain-free throughout his or her growing years is of utmost importance. Unfortunately, there are still diseases that children may acquire that cause them pain, despite increased efforts.

Croup is an example of this type of illness. It’s mainly characterized by an infection of the child’s larynx (voice box) and trachea (windpipe), which are the upper and lower parts of the breathing tube connecting the mouth to the top of the lungs.1 Once these areas are heavily affected, it can cause obstructed breathing, a distinct barking cough and stridor, a high-pitched whistling sound when breathing.2

Even worse, croup is highly contagious. It can spread from one person to another, usually between an infected child to another child or adult, by:3

Physical contact

Inhaling mucus droplets in the air that were expelled by an infected person during sneezing or coughing

Indirect contact with items like toys, utensils, cups and other objects with traces of contaminated mucus

Croup in Numbers: How Common Is This Disease?

Croup is common among infants and toddlers who are 6 months to 3 years old. Most croup cases occur in 1-year-old children. However, babies as young as 3 months old can develop croup, too. The same goes for older children up to 15 years old and adults (albeit rare).4

Annually, croup shows up in 3 percent of children, and these croup infections are almost always caused by a virus. Seventy-five percent of croup infections are initiated by the parainfluenza virus,5 although other agents like measles, rhinovirus, influenza, enteroviruses and respiratory syncytial virus can trigger this disease.6

The majority of croup infections can be treated at home,7 but there is a 1.5 to 31 percent risk that an infected child will be hospitalized, depending on the severity of the disease.8

Read These Articles to Know What You Should Do to Avoid Croup

Your children deserves nothing less than the best when it comes to receiving the protection they need against diseases. If you’re a parent or guardian, take some time to read these Croup pages. These informative articles will provide you must-know knowledge about this common disease, particularly about its symptoms, transmission methods, causes and types.

You will also learn how to help relieve croup in a child safely and naturally (given that most physicians prescribe pharmaceutical drugs that can be harmful to children), plus ideal ways to prevent this condition in the first place.

MORE ABOUT CROUP

Croup: Introduction

What Is Croup?

Is Croup Contagious?

Croup in Adults

Croup Symptoms

Croup Causes

Types of Croup

Croup Treatment

Essential Oils for Croup

Croup Prevention

Croup FAQ


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What Is Croup?

[+]Sources and References [-]Sources and References

  • 1 Kenny, Knott and Bonsall, “Croup,” Patient, February 16, 2015
  • 2 Mayo Clinic Staff, “Croup Overview,” Mayo Clinic, December 19, 2015
  • 3 Davis and Shiel, “Is Croup Contagious?” MedicineNet, August 16, 2016
  • 4 “Croup — Introduction,” NHS Choices, August 28, 2014
  • 5 Johnson, D. W. (2009). “Croup.” BMJ Clinical Evidence, 2009, 0321
  • 6 “Croup — Causes,” NHS Choices, August 28, 2014
  • 7 Mayo Clinic Staff, “Croup Treatment,” Mayo Clinic, December 19, 2015
  • 8 Nichols and Webberley, “What Is Croup? What Causes Croup?” Medical News Today, January 19, 2016