Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) About Astigmatism

frequently asked questions about astigmatism

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  • Astigmatism is not an infectious condition – it just means that your eyes are not perfectly round, causing the light that enters them to become bent in more than one direction
  • If you have astigmatism, however, the eyeballs are shaped more like a football or a rugby ball, or the back of a spoon. Because of this irregular shape, the light that enters the eyes becomes more bent in one direction than another
  • The hallmark symptom of astigmatism is blurry vision, which occurs when the eye and its other elements are unable to focus a point object into a sharply focused picture on the retina

Q: How do you get astigmatism?

A: Astigmatism is not an infectious condition – it just means that your eyes are not perfectly round, causing the light that enters them to become bent in more than one direction. This prompts symptoms like distorted, blurry or fluctuating vision, headaches and eye strain. The imperfect curvature of the eye may be present during birth, but other factors may cause it as well, such as eye surgery or an accident that affects the cornea.

Q: What does an eyeball with astigmatism look like?

A: In a person with normal vision, the eyeball is shaped like a perfectly round ball. If you have astigmatism, however, the eyeballs are shaped more like a football or a rugby ball, or the back of a spoon. Because of this irregular shape, the light that enters the eyes becomes more bent in one direction than another.

Q: Is astigmatism genetic?

A: It is uncertain whether astigmatism has a hereditary component, as the exact cause of this refractive error is still unknown. However, it’s believed that genetics may be a factor, as this condition can be present already at birth. However, astigmatism may also arise due to external factors, such as eye surgery or injury.1

Q: How does astigmatism affect your vision?

A: The hallmark symptom of astigmatism is blurry vision, which occurs when the eye and its other elements are unable to focus a point object into a sharply focused picture on the retina.

Other symptoms of astigmatism include eye irritation, fatigue or strain, fluctuating vision, headaches and difficulty seeing in the dark. These symptoms usually manifest after activities like reading, spending long hours in front of a computer or staring at a far-off object.

Q: How do I know if have astigmatism?

A: The best way on how to tell if you have astigmatism is to have your eyes checked. You need to consult a professional eye doctor, either an ophthalmologist or optometrist, who can conduct specialized tests to check your vision and symptoms.

Some of the most common tests for astigmatism include retinoscopy, vision test, refraction and keratometry. Once the type of astigmatism that you have has been determined, your doctor will then prescribe corrective methods to help give you clear vision.

Q: How do you treat or correct astigmatism?

A: For mild astigmatism, eye doctors usually do not prescribe any treatment. However, for severe cases or if the refractive error is making daily visual tasks difficult, eye doctors will usually prescribe corrective lenses, such as eyeglasses or contacts, that are specially fitted to the patient’s condition.

Q: Can LASIK fix astigmatism?

A: Also known as laser in situ keratomileusis, LASIK is a type of refractive surgery that works by sculpting the cornea’ s shape. However, it’s usually recommended for extreme cases of astigmatism. LASIK is not advisable for certain groups of people, such as diabetics, pregnant or breastfeeding women and people with glaucoma or cataracts.

Q: Can a person with astigmatism wear contacts?

A: There are specialized contacts that are made for people with astigmatism. These include toric contact lenses, rigid glass permeable (RGP or GP) contact lenses and hybrid contact lenses. Unlike soft contact lenses for nearsightedness or farsightedness, these are specially created to address the refractive error of the patient, and also cost more.

However, remember that contact lenses in general can have repercussions on your eyes and overall health, so take extreme caution when wearing them.

MORE ABOUT ASTIGMATISM

Astigmatism: Introduction

What Is Astigmatism?

Astigmatism Symptoms

Astigmatism Causes

Astigmatism Test

Types of Astigmatism

Astigmatism Treatment

Contact Lenses For Astigmatism

Astigmatism Prevention

Astigmatism FAQ



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