Astigmatism Prevention: Can You Keep It From Occurring?

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  • One of the best things you can do to prevent astigmatism from becoming worse is to stay away from ocular strain
  • Eating a healthy, wholesome diet is crucial if you have astigmatism or any type of eye disorder
  • Another nutrient that’s essential for eye health is astaxanthin, which is also found in salmon. It’s said to be helpful for preventing blindness, and is more powerful than lutein and zeaxanthin

Astigmatism commonly manifests because of a congenital defect in the structure of the eye; hence, it cannot be avoided. The changes that may naturally occur in the cornea may also be difficult to prevent. However, it’s possible for you to prevent accident-triggered astigmatism, by making sure to protect your eyes from injuries.1

Avoiding Ocular Strain May Help Keep Astigmatism From Worsening

Whether you’re suffering from regular (genetic irregularity in the shape of the eyeball) or irregular (caused by injury or surgery) astigmatism, one thing is certain: Added stress on the eyes can worsen or aggravate the condition, leading to more pronounced symptoms like blurry vision, headaches and squinting. Some of the common causes of ocular strain include:2

  • Using a computer or watching TV for long periods of time
  • Reading, especially in poor lighting
  • Having a job that requires a significant amount of fine detailed work
  • Not drinking enough water (to keep the eyes hydrated)
  • Failing to get sufficient nutrients that are necessary for eye health

Hence, one of the best things you can do to prevent astigmatism from becoming worse is to stay away from ocular strain. Here are some easy tips you can try:

Whether you’re reading, spending time in front of the computer or doing fine detailed work, give your eyes time to rest. One simple thing you can do is to follow the 10-10-10 rule throughout the day: Every 10 minutes, look at something that is 10 feet away for at least 10 seconds.3

If you’re sitting beside a window, look outside at the trees, another building or gaze at the clouds. If there’s no outside view from your position, just look at a distant object, like an artwork on the wall or shelves on the opposite side of the room.

Blink frequently. This not only relieves the stress, but it also allows the eyes to lubricate themselves and prevents dryness. This is important, especially if you’re always working in front of a computer or reading.

Have excellent lighting where you work. Poor lighting prompts you to strain and squint, placing added stress on your eyes. As much as possible, however, opt for incandescent bulbs instead of LED bulbs as an artificial source (if you cannot get natural lighting, such as sunlight). LEDs have been linked to age-related macular degeneration (AMD), which is the leading cause of blindness in the U.S.

Have a humidifier in your home or workplace. Using either a heater or air conditioning can dry out the air, leading to stress and irritation on the eyes.

You can also try the Bates Method. This is a mental approach that focuses on identifying what’s causing stress on your eyes and addressing it, so you can get your healthy vision back. While it’s not a medical approach, the Bates Method lets you engage your imagination and mind, relaxing your eyes and triggering natural healing. Make sure that you are guided by a licensed physician while doing this technique.

What to Eat to Keep Your Eyes Healthy

Remember that what goes inside your mouth and into your stomach ultimately affects your eyes. Hence, eating a healthy, wholesome diet is crucial if you have astigmatism or any type of eye disorder. Here are the best foods to boost your eye health:

Dark leafy green vegetables – These contain the antioxidants zeaxanthin and lutein, which are both important for eye health. Some of the best choices are kale, spinach, Swiss chard, broccoli, collard greens and Brussels sprouts.

Organic pastured egg yolks – These are also rich in lutein and zeaxanthin, along with protein and healthy fats. However, you should cook your egg yolks very lightly, such as poached or soft-boiled, as heating them can damage the antioxidants.

Black currants – These fruits contain among the highest anthocyanin levels in nature, with at least 190 to 270 milligrams per 100 grams.

Orange pepper – According to a study in the British Journal of Ophthalmology, orange pepper outranked 33 other fruits and vegetables tested in terms of its zeaxanthin content.

Bilberries – This nutritional powerhouse also contains high amounts of anthocyanins. It’s said that bilberry extract can have a protective effect on visual function during retinal inflammation.4

Wild-caught Alaskan salmon – This contains omega-3s in the form of DHA, which is actually concentrated in your retina. DHA gives cell membranes structural support to boost eye health and protect retinal function.

Another nutrient that’s essential for eye health is astaxanthin, which is also found in salmon. It’s said to be helpful for preventing blindness, and is more powerful than lutein and zeaxanthin. Astaxanthin may help protect against various eye disorders, such as:

Age-related macular degeneration (ARMD)

Cataracts

Glaucoma

Diabetic retinopathy

Cystoid macular edema

Venous occlusion

Retinal arterial occlusion

Inflammatory eye diseases (i.e., retinitis, iritis, keratitis, and scleritis)


Aside from salmon, you can also get astaxanthin from a high-quality astaxanthin supplement or from krill oil.

MORE ABOUT ASTIGMATISM

Astigmatism: Introduction

What Is Astigmatism?

Astigmatism Symptoms

Astigmatism Causes

Astigmatism Test

Types of Astigmatism

Astigmatism Treatment

Contact Lenses For Astigmatism

Astigmatism Prevention

Astigmatism FAQ



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