How to Prevent Celiac Disease Symptoms From Worsening

gluten-free diet

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  • Research by Stephanie Seneff, Ph.D., of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) showed that glyphosate destroys the villi in the gut and lessens the body’s ability to absorb vitamins and minerals
  • Dr. Stefano Guandalini of the University of Chicago Medicine Comer Children’s Hospital said that a child has a 50 percent chance of developing celiac disease if either or both parents have genes linked to the illness

While celiac disease cannot be prevented, you can avoid worsened symptoms and further damage by following these tips:1,2

Eating a gluten-free diet: the most effective form of treatment or prevention for this disorder, patients should avoid products that may contain grains, such as:3

Wheat, barley, rye and triticale

Wheat flours and processed meat products

Sweets

Sauces and seasonings

Drinks and baked goods.

Always remember to check food labels thoroughly because there are “gluten-free” foods that might still contain traces of this protein, as some manufacturers tend to abuse the use of this label for the sake of profit.

Avoid consuming grains and grain byproducts, especially wheat: Most people could benefit from a gluten-free diet, even if they haven’t been diagnosed with this illness.

This is because harmful herbicides like Roundup are sprayed on whole grain crops like wheat. Further, these substances contain a chemical called glyphosate that can trigger celiac disease, wheat allergies and wheat sensitivity.

Research by Stephanie Seneff, Ph.D., of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), showed that glyphosate destroys the villi in the gut and lessens the body’s ability to absorb vitamins and minerals.

Glyphosate then disrupts the connections between wheat proteins, causing the grain to become indigestible.

This chemical also plays a role in gut dysbiosis (microbial imbalance in the intestines), overgrowth of pathogens, leaky gut syndrome (wherein undigested food, bacteria and metabolic waste products leak into the blood stream), immune system defects and increased inflammation.

Diagnosing the disease as early as possible: Even if you aren’t experiencing symptoms, you should be tested for celiac disease, especially if you have relatives with the disorder, as genetics can play a role in the onset of the disorder.

Pregnant Women Can Lower a Child’s Risk of Celiac Disease

Celiac disease can affect multiple family members. The University of Chicago Medicine Celiac Disease Center points out that 1 in 22 people with celiac disease have a first-degree relative with this illness, while 1 in 39 celiac disease sufferers have a second-degree relative with the same health problem.4

Dr. Stefano Guandalini of the University of Chicago Medicine Comer Children’s Hospital said that a child has a 50 percent chance of developing celiac disease if either or both parents have genes linked to the illness. However, mothers can reduce their child’s risk for celiac disease by:5

Staying on a strict gluten-free diet while pregnant: If you’re a pregnant woman with celiac disease, be consistent in following a gluten-free diet.

Gluten consumption during pregnancy can make the disease active and lead to malabsorption of nutrients in both the mother and child, and can be a higher risk for miscarriage.

Considering a genetic test for the baby: Your doctor can check if your newborn baby carries the gene/s associated with celiac disease.

If the result is positive, an antibody blood test should be performed once the child turns 3 years old and every two to three years after. This determines if the disease has become active in the child.

If your child is already exhibiting symptoms of celiac disease, consult a doctor and have your child checked.

Breastfeeding for at least six months: Research showed that there may be a delay in symptoms among breastfed babies who are at risk for celiac disease, as well as a decreased possibility of being diagnosed with the illness later in life.

Introducing gluten slowly once the child is between 4 to 6 months old: A study among Swedish children showed that adding gluten to children’s diets while breastfeeding lowered their risk of celiac disease once they turn 2 years old.

Mothers who continued to breastfeed their children after adding gluten into the diet also ended up reducing their children’s risk for celiac disease.

Make sure to give the baby small amounts of gluten first, since high quantities of gluten could increase a child’s risk for celiac disease.

Watching out for celiac disease symptoms: These include vomiting, diarrhea, fatigue, irritability and a failure to thrive.


MORE ABOUT CELIAC DISEASE

Celiac Disease: Introduction

What Is Celiac Disease?

Celiac Disease In Children

Celiac Disease Causes

Celiac Disease Types

Celiac Disease Symptoms

Celiac Disease Diagnosis

Celiac Disease Treatment

Celiac Disease Prevention

Celiac Disease Diet

Celiac Disease FAQ

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