Buy 2 Get 1 Free Any Box of Mitomix Keto Bars Buy 2 Get 1 Free Any Box of Mitomix Keto Bars

ADVERTISEMENT

Types of celiac disease

Fact Checked

celiac disease in dictionary

Story at-a-glance -

  • Celiac disease can be further classified into three conditions, depending on the symptoms (or lack thereof) that a patient experiences
  • Classical celiac disease often begins during early childhood, when foods containing gluten are introduced into the diet for the first time. However, adults can develop this condition too
  • No matter what type of celiac disease you might be diagnosed with, consult a physician immediately if potential symptoms are showing up

Celiac disease can be classified into three types, depending on the symptoms (or lack thereof) that a patient experiences. The three classifications by the Celiac Disease Foundation are classical, nonclassical and asymptomatic.1 Read on to learn more about the differences between these types.

Classical celiac disease

Classical celiac disease often begins during early childhood, when foods containing gluten are introduced into the diet for the first time. However, adults can develop this condition too. It’s characterized by symptoms related to small intestinal damage and impaired absorption, which include:2,3

  • Diarrhea
  • Steatorrhea, a condition wherein the stool are pale, foul-smelling and fatty
  • Abdominal bloating and discomfort
  • Reduced weight and muscle mass

Children with classical celiac disease may also experience bloated tummy, irritability and failure to grow and thrive.4

Nonclassical celiac disease

Also known as atypical celiac disease, this condition is commonly diagnosed in adults and in children age 5 and above. It does not cause malabsorption or common small intestine symptoms, but manifests through symptoms that may seem unrelated to this illness.5 According to the Celiac Disease Foundation, the symptoms of this condition include:6

  • Iron deficiency anemia
  • Stomach pain or distention
  • Heartburn
  • Chronic fatigue
  • Migraine
  • Tingling, numbness or pain in the hands or feet
  • Unexplained chronic elevated liver enzymes
  • Bone weakness
  • Vitamin deficiency, particularly in folate and vitamin B12
  • Unexplained infertility
  • Late menarche in girls
  • Early menopause
  • Depression and anxiety
  • Damaged dental enamel
  • Dermatitis herpetiformis (skin rash)

Asymptomatic celiac disease

According to a study in World Journal Gastrointestinal Pathophysiology, people with asymptomatic celiac disease (also called silent celiac disease) have “serological and histological abnormalities” associated with this disease, including intestinal villi damage, but they do not experience its hallmark digestive symptoms.

Asymptomatic celiac disease is commonly diagnosed in individuals who has a relative who’s been diagnosed with has celiac disease, as well as in patients with coexisting autoimmune and genetic disorders.7,8

No matter what type of celiac disease you or someone you know might be diagnosed with, consult a physician immediately if potential symptoms are showing up. This could mean the difference between a swift recovery from this disease and a painful and lifelong struggle.

MORE ABOUT CELIAC DISEASE

Celiac Disease: Introduction

What Is Celiac Disease?

Celiac Disease In Children

Celiac Disease Causes

Celiac Disease Types

Celiac Disease Symptoms

Celiac Disease Diagnosis

Celiac Disease Treatment

Celiac Disease Prevention

Celiac Disease Diet

Celiac Disease FAQ

< Previous

Celiac Disease Causes

Next >

Celiac Disease Symptoms

Click Here and be the first to comment on this article
Post your comment