Chickenpox Prevention: How to Keep It From Spreading

Girl with chickenpox wearing mask

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  • Since chickenpox causes more harm in older individuals, acquiring it during childhood — as long as the child is inherently healthy — seems like the best way to help prevent this illness from causing severe complications in the future
  • Remember that chickenpox can also spread through saliva or by indirect physical contact, as the virus can be transferred to objects that have been used by the infected individual. Make sure to thoroughly disinfect all these items using an all-natural disinfectant to help kill the virus

Conventional health practitioners often warn against the potential complications of chickenpox to encourage people to get vaccinated against this disease. But the truth is that the chickenpox vaccine, which is made from live attenuated (weakened) varicella virus, only gives temporary immunity. Rather, the best way to help prevent the damaging effects of this illness is to acquire it during childhood and then naturally recover from it.

Many Years Ago, Children Acquired a Natural Immunity to Chickenpox

Before the advent of the chickenpox vaccine, this illness was known as one of the most popular childhood diseases. Being infected with it was even considered a “rite of passage,” and for good reason (and purpose) — children who became infected with the virus developed a natural and long-lasting immunity to the illness.

In fact, in 1995, it was estimated that only 10 percent of the American population over 15 years old had not had chickenpox.1 For 99.9 percent of healthy children, it’s actually treated as a mild disease that does not pose any complications.2

Since chickenpox causes more harm in older individuals, acquiring it during childhood — as long as the child is inherently healthy — seems like the best way to help prevent this illness from causing severe complications in the future. All that’s needed is for the symptoms to be well-managed while the virus runs its course, and the patient to be as comfortable as possible.

If There’s a High-Risk Individual in Your Home, Remember These Precautions

For most healthy children, chickenpox is a highly manageable disease, but keep in mind that it can be dangerous for certain groups of people, namely:3

Adults who have not acquired the illness in childhood

Pregnant women

Newborn babies

Those with weakened immune systems (immunocompromised), such as those who take steroid medications, have HIV, have undergone an organ transplant, or are on chemotherapy

The elderly

If you fall under any of these groups, or if someone in your household does, it’s important to keep them away from a child who is recuperating from chickenpox until all the blisters have dried and scabbed over, which means the infection is no longer contagious.

Remember that chickenpox can also spread through saliva or by indirect physical contact, as the virus can be transferred to objects that have been used by the infected individual, such as bedding, toys and clothing. Make sure to thoroughly disinfect all these items using an all-natural disinfectant to help kill the virus.4

Sun Exposure May Help Prevent Chickenpox From Spreading

Interesting 2011 research, which evaluated data from 25 studies, claimed that there is a clear link between UV levels and chickenpox prevalence. According to the findings, the rates of this disease are significantly lower in the tropics, where there’s sun exposure year-round. However, the disease flares up in temperate regions, often during the darker, cold-weathered months.

The research authors speculated that UV radiation may play a role in inactivating the virus, either while it’s still contained in the lesions or after the lesions have erupted.

But that’s not the only benefit you can get from getting enough sun: You also optimize your vitamin D production, a nutrient that gives you immune-boosting and antiviral benefits. However, keep in mind that overexposing the lesions to the sun could result in sunburn, which can contribute to permanent scarring. So, once the lesions have appeared, it might be better to avoid direct sunlight.

MORE ABOUT CHICKENPOX

Chickenpox: An Introduction

What Is Chickenpox?

Chickenpox Symptoms

Chickenpox Causes

Chickenpox Treatment

Chickenpox Prevention

Chickenpox Diet

Chickenpox FAQ


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