Chlamydia: Beware of This Sexually Transmitted Infection

chlamydia sexually transmitted infection

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  • Chlamydia is the most commonly reported sexually transmitted infection (STI) in the U.S. It’s a bacterial infection caused by a strain called Chlamydia trachomatis that’s spread by having sexual contact (vaginal, anal or oral sex) with an infected individual
  • Women are more likely to be diagnosed with chlamydia, but men can be infected with this STI as well

Occurrences of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) around the world are rising, and according to the World Health Organization (WHO), more than 1 million STIs are acquired EVERY DAY worldwide. This amounts to over 357 million new cases of STIs, such as gonorrhea (78 million), syphilis (5.6 million), trichomoniasis (143 million), and chlamydia (131 million), per year.1

In the U.S. nearly 20 million new STIs occur each year, with half of them happening among people aged 15 to 24 years old. While women are most severely affected by STIs — with undiagnosed cases causing an estimated 20,000 instances of infertility in women every year — men contributed to the overall increase in 2015.2,

Of the four mentioned STIs, chlamydia is the most commonly reported in the U.S. It’s a bacterial infection caused by a strain called Chlamydia trachomatis that’s spread by having sexual contact (vaginal, anal or oral sex) with an infected individual.3,4 Chlamydia is known to have similarities with gonorrhea, another type of sexually transmitted disease, in terms of symptoms and transmission patterns.5

In 2015 statistics from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), there were 1,526,658 reported cases of chlamydia in the United States, the highest number ever reported to the CDC.6

The sad fact is, there are likely many more undiagnosed cases, since this STI is known to not manifest its symptoms, leading people to not seek testing.8

Just like in the U.S., chlamydia is also one of the most common STIs in the U.K.9 Specifically in England, in a Health Protection Report by Public Health England published June 6, 2017, there were 202,546 diagnosed cases of chlamydia, accounting for 49 percent of all new STI cases in the country, the highest incidence rate when compared to genital warts, gonorrhea and nonspecific genital infections. Of these cases, 128,000 were among people aged 15 to 24 years old.10

Women are more likely to be diagnosed with chlamydia,11 but men can be infected with it as well. There are risk factors that can predispose you to a higher risk of being affected and lowering your resistance toward the disease, such as being diagnosed with another STI in the past, having another infection, your age and the number of sexual partners you’ve had.12,13

Being diagnosed with chlamydia can be a scary ordeal, but if you’re armed with the right information, you can treat this STI quickly. These guides on chlamydia are designed to help you do just that. Keep reading to learn how it affects your body, where the usual attack points are and the different ways you can combat this infection.

MORE ABOUT CHLAMYDIA

Chlamydia: Introduction

Chlamydia Types

Chlamydia Symptoms

Chlamydia Causes

Chlamydia Treatment

Chlamydia Prevention

Chlamydia Diet



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Chlamydia Types

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