Prediabetes Diet: Sidestep Diabetes by Managing Your Food Intake

Brussel sprouts

Story at-a-glance -

  • Many prediabetes prevention plans revolve around two crucial lifestyle factors: a healthy diet and regular exercise
  • Since diabetes is a disease rooted in insulin resistance, which occurs due to excessive sugar intake, removing sugar should be the first course of action to reverse prediabetes

In a 2016 report from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, it’s said that as many as 86 million people are now living with prediabetes. If not swiftly acted on, this can lead to not only Type 2 diabetes, but also a host of chronic diseases that can greatly endanger your life.1

The good news is that you can reduce or eliminate your risk of diabetes through simple lifestyle changes. The best place to start is to evaluate your diet. In fact, many prediabetes prevention plans revolve around two crucial lifestyle factors: a healthy diet and regular exercise.2

An Effective Prediabetic Diet Starts With Eliminating Sugar and Grains

Since diabetes is a disease rooted in insulin resistance, which occurs due to excessive sugar intake, removing sugar from your diet should be the first course of action to reverse prediabetes. The problem is that sugar lurks in virtually all processed foods, hiding behind innocent-sounding names like maltodextrin, dextrose, maltose and galactose.3

Even some healthy foods contain sugar. For example, store-bought fruit-flavored yogurt, touted as an “excellent source” of probiotics, can actually have 20 grams of sugar (5 teaspoons) in every serving!

According to a study published in 2014, 10 percent of Americans are consuming 25 percent or more of their everyday calories in the form of added sugars. For 71 percent of adults, at least 10 percent of their day-to-day calories come from sugar. Based on this data, it should be no surprise that more than 24 million Americans are now suffering from diabetes.4

The first step to successfully avoid a progression to full-blown diabetes is to remove all forms of sugar from your diet, including all processed foods and beverages. Instead, stick to home-cooked meals made from scratch. You should also limit your fruit intake, as some may contain high amounts of fructose.

In addition, you should also limit your consumption of grains, which  are  transformed to sugar in your body. Even whole, organic grains should be reduced drastically, especially if you’re already in a prediabetic state.

Replace Sugar With These Foods

After eliminating sugar and grains from your diet, you will need to switch to other healthy types of foods to provide energy for your body. The ideal replacements should be:

Non-starchy vegetables — Leafy vegetables like Brussels sprouts, kale, spinach, watercress and cabbage are ideal choices.5

Significant amounts of high-quality healthy fat — Make sure that you’re consuming healthy saturated and monounsaturated fats, and not trans fat, which can interfere with your insulin receptors and increase your risk for diabetes.

Some of the best healthy fat sources are avocados, nuts, coconuts and coconut oil, animal fats and raw butter. Most people should be getting 50 to 85 percent of their everyday calories from these healthy fats, instead of sugar and grains.

Low-to-moderate amounts of high-quality protein — It’s crucial to only eat just the right amount of protein, as too much of it may actually be bad for your health.

Most people only need one-half gram per pound of lean body mass. Good protein sources include pastured eggs, fish, grass fed meat, dairy, nuts and legumes.

Consider Timing Your Meals

If you’re still struggling with your blood sugar levels despite following the dietary and exercise recommendations, you should also incorporate intermittent fasting into your routine. This is a strategy that involves timing your meals so that you cycle through periods of feast and famine.

According to research, this creates a number of biological benefits, such as weight loss, improved insulin and leptin sensitivity, and lowered triglycerides. Follow the schedule until your insulin or leptin resistance improves; once it does, you can then do it only as needed, to maintain your healthy state. 

< Previous

Pre Diabetes Symptoms

Next >

Type 1 Diabetes Versus Type 2 Diabetes

Click Here and be the first to comment on this article
Post your comment