Get over 45% Off on Organic Collagen Powder Create Your Own 2-Pack Get over 45% Off on Organic Collagen Powder Create Your Own 2-Pack

ADVERTISEMENT

Diverticulitis Diet: Foods to Eat and What to Avoid

Fact Checked

Artichokes

Story at-a-glance -

  • Most physicians will recommend that you consume a high-fiber diet. Fiber softens your stools, allowing them to pass through your intestines and colon more quickly and easily
  • In severe diverticulitis cases, however, switching to a high-fiber diet too soon may not be effective, and may only worsen the symptoms. Instead, your physician will likely recommend a clear liquid diet first

If you have a mild case of diverticulitis, your physician will likely prescribe a specific diet as part of your treatment plan. While it may not completely treat the illness, it can give your digestive system a chance to “rest,” so that it can recover from the infection.

High-Fiber Foods for Diverticulitis

Most physicians will recommend that you consume a high-fiber diet. Fiber softens your stools, allowing them to pass through your intestines and colon more quickly and easily. Some of the best fiber-rich foods include:1,2,3

  • Cooked split peas (16.3 grams per cup)
  • Cooked green peas (8.8 grams per cup)
  • Artichokes (10.3 grams in a medium-sized artichoke)
  • Raspberries (8 grams per cup)
  • Collard greens (7.6 grams per cup)
  • Blackberries (7.6 grams per cup)
  • Avocados (6.7 grams in half an avocado)
  • Pears (5.5 grams in a medium-sized pear)
  • Spinach (4.32 grams per cup)
  • Brussels sprouts (4.1 grams per cup)
  • Flaxseeds (3.82 grams per 2 tablespoons)

A Clear Liquid Diet May Be Recommended for Some People

In severe diverticulitis cases, switching to a high-fiber diet too soon may not be effective, and may only worsen the symptoms. Instead, your physician will likely recommend a clear liquid diet first.4 These foods include:5

  • Ice pops without bits of fruit or fruit pulp
  • Gelatin
  • Tea or coffee without cream

Bone broth is particularly good, as it provides you with easily digestible nutrients, such as calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, iron and zinc.6 The gelatinous collagen in bone broth also has amazing curative properties. It also contains amino acids like glutamine that may help support proper digestion.7

Aside from pure and clear water, ginger tea is another soothing drink that you should add to your diet. Sip on warm ginger tea two to three times daily, as it will help reduce inflammation and aid in digestion. This healing food works wonders on your immune and digestive systems.8

Once your diverticulitis symptoms have lessened, you can move on to consuming easily digestible foods, ideally grated, steamed and pureed fruits and vegetables. Avoid those that have tough skins and small seeds that may accumulate in the diverticula sacs. When you feel better, you can start to add fiber-rich foods, including raw fruits and vegetables, to your diet.

Remember that digestion starts in the mouth, so make it a habit to chew each bite of your food thoroughly, or until it is nearly liquefied. The more you break down the food before it goes to your stomach, the more readily absorbed the nutrients become.9

Food plays a great role in how you manage diverticulitis, so remember to discuss your diet needs and restrictions with your physician. Write down your questions, and make sure you clarify which foods are safe and which ones are not. You can also ask for a referral to a holistic dietitian who can help you come up with a well-balanced meal plan to alleviate your condition.

MORE ABOUT DIVERTICULITIS

Diverticulitis: Introduction

What Is Diverticulitis?

Diverticulitis Causes

Diverticulitis Types

Is Diverticulitis Hereditary?

Diverticulitis Signs and Symptoms

Diverticulitis Treatment

Diverticulitis Prevention

Diverticulitis Diet

Diverticulitis FAQ

< Previous

Diverticulitis Prevention

Next >

Diverticulitis FAQ