An Introduction to Folliculitis

folliculitis

Story at-a-glance -

  • Folliculitis is usually self-limited and generally noncontagious, especially when it is only caused by skin trauma. However, there are instances where folliculitis may be transmitted from person to person, especially when the infection is caused by bacterial or viral infections
  • There are numerous options for you to avoid folliculitis, starting with adequately informing yourself of what this condition is or why it happens

Acne may be one of the most common woes of people belonging to different age groups, but are you entirely sure that you’re not suffering from another skin condition? The small red bumps that are usually indicative of acne may be caused by numerous skin ailments, one of which is folliculitis.

The problem is that most people can easily mistake folliculitis for acne. This causes them to use acne products to deal with the bumps. Unfortunately, these products won’t work on folliculitis, which may cause a lot of frustration for patients.1

The easiest way to set acne apart from folliculitis is the latter has a hair right in the middle of the pustule.2 To better differentiate between these two conditions and deal with them more appropriately, adequate information is needed. Continue reading these articles to know what folliculitis is, its symptoms, possible causes and treatment.

Is Folliculitis Contagious?

Fortunately, folliculitis is usually self-limited and generally noncontagious, especially when it is only caused by skin trauma. However, there are instances where folliculitis may be transmitted from person to person, for example, when the infection is caused by bacterial or viral infections. The most common modes of transmission for infectious folliculitis include sharing razor blades, skin-to-skin contact and through public baths, hot tubs or spas.3

It should be noted that while folliculitis is normally mistaken for herpes, these two conditions are not at all related. Herpes is a sexually transmitted disease that causes clusters of blisters in the genital or oral area, while folliculitis is characterized by small pimple-like abscesses that can occur in any area of skin. Herpes is also highly contagious, while only select types of folliculitis can be passed from person to person.4

If you think that you might be affected or you suspect that someone close to you has folliculitis, make sure that you take preventive measures to avoid spreading the condition or contracting it yourself. There are numerous options for you to avoid folliculitis, starting with adequately informing yourself of what this condition is and why it happens.

Is Folliculitis Dangerous?

Folliculitis isn’t particularly dangerous, with the condition usually running its course and going away after a week.5 There are numerous treatment options to lessen the inflammation and make it go away faster, including warm compresses and topical solutions.6,7

Most of the effects of folliculitis only affect the appearance of the skin, and it does not lead to internal issues or serious complications. However, there are instances when it can cause scarring and permanent hair loss. This is usually seen in cases where a deeper part of the hair follicle becomes infected.8

Other complications that may arise when this condition is not well taken care of include cyst or abscess formation, with some cases requiring surgical drainage or cyst removal when they start to cause pain. It can also lead to cellulitis, or the infection of the deeper layers of the skin.9

Because of the numerous conditions that share symptoms with folliculitis, accuracy is of utmost importance when it comes to diagnosis. If the condition does not heal in a few days, consider visiting a health practitioner for a checkup. This will ensure that you’re not affected by anything more severe.

MORE ABOUT FOLLICULITIS

Folliculitis: Introduction

What Is Folliculitis?

Folliculitis Symptoms

Folliculitis Causes

Folliculitis Types

Folliculitis Treatment

Folliculitis Prevention

Folliculitis Diet

Folliculitis FAQ

Next >

What Is Folliculitis?

Post your comment
Click Here and be the first to comment on this article