Hemorrhoids Treatment and Home Remedies


Story at-a-glance

  • There are numerous ways to treat and get rid of hemorrhoids, ranging from simple and easy-to-do techniques to other non-surgical procedures
  • If you or someone you know is suffering from hemorrhoids, here’s a piece of good news: You can treat hemorrhoids at home using any of the following techniques

Hemorrhoids are painful and can have a negative impact on your daily activities.1 Fortunately, there are numerous ways to treat and eliminate them, ranging from simple and easy-to-do techniques to non-surgical procedures that may look complicated, but are doable with the help of a professional.

Treating Hemorrhoids at Home

If you or someone you know is suffering from hemorrhoids, here's a piece of good news: You can treat hemorrhoids at home using any of the following techniques:

Nonsurgical Treatments for Hemorrhoids

There are three types of non-surgical methods that can get rid of hemorrhoids. Just make sure to consult with your physician first before undergoing any of them, since there are pros and cons to each.3,4,5,6

Rubber band ligation: This is considered to be the least invasive treatment available for hemorrhoids. Ligation is less painful and risky compared to surgery and is effective in treating internal hemorrhoids in the long term. During ligation, a rubber band is wrapped at the base of the hemorrhoid, essentially cutting off the blood flow. The constriction causes the hemorrhoid to shrink and fall off in a week.

However, rubber band ligation does not work on external hemorrhoids and is not suitable for people taking anticoagulant medication. This procedure could also lead to bleeding, pain and ulcers or open sores and may need to be repeated should you have multiple hemorrhoids.

Infrared coagulation: Also called electrotherapy, infrared coagulation can eliminate smaller hemorrhoids. After applying a local anesthetic on the area, an infrared coagulation device is used to heat the hemorrhoid, burning the tissues, for a brief period. This causes a scar to form that blocks blood flow to the hemorrhoid.

Unfortunately, infrared coagulation has its cons. Just like rubber band ligation, several infrared coagulation procedures might be needed to treat hemorrhoids in multiple areas. The recovery period also takes a few days more and in some cases, bleeding might occur. Stool softeners might also be needed to prevent straining and reopening of the scar.

Sclerotherapy: To get rid of the hemorrhoid, a chemical solution is injected directly into the internal hemorrhoid or in the area around it. A local reaction occurs that causes the hemorrhoid to shrink because blood flow is prevented.

Just like rubber band ligation, sclerotherapy is not recommended for people with external hemorrhoids and those taking anticoagulant medication. This method can also cause pain and bleeding and is said to be less effective than rubber band ligation. Even worse, there's a possibility that the hemorrhoids will return.

MORE ABOUT HEMORRHOIDS

Hemorrhoids: Introduction

What Are Hemorrhoids?

Hemorrhoids Causes

Hemorrhoids Types

Hemorrhoids Symptoms

Hemorrhoids In Pregnancy

Hemorrhoids Treatment

Hemorrhoids Surgery

Hemorrhoids Prevention

Essential Oils for Hemorrhoids

Hemorrhoids Diet

Hemorrhoids FAQ

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Hemorrhoids Surgery

[+]Sources and References [-]Sources and References

  • 1 “Haemorrhoids (piles),” NHS Choices, March 11, 2016
  • 2 “Hemorrhoids and what to do about them,” Harvard Health Publications Harvard Medical School, January 27, 2016
  • 3 Ong, “Hemorrhoids: 19 tips to cure the pain in the butt,” PhilStar, October 11, 2011
  • 4 “Hemorrhoids,” Medical University of South Carolina
  • 5 “Hemorrhoids,” Drugs
  • 6 “Haemorrhoids (piles) – Treatment options,” NHS Choices, March 11, 2016