Surgeries That Can Help Treat Hiatal Hernia

doctors performing surgery

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  • If all holistic options have been exhausted and the condition does not improve, surgery may be the last resort
  • As with any method of invasive surgery, procedures done to fix hiatal hernia carry their own risks, such as the occurrence of a reflux. To prevent this, the surgeon may concurrently perform an anti-reflux procedure to reduce the occurrence of reflux and hernia altogether

Most cases of hiatal hernia are asymptomatic, and you can generally live your life without any problems. However, there are some who don’t respond well to natural treatments. If all holistic options have been exhausted and the condition does not improve, surgery may be the last resort.

The following are the surgery methods that you can undertake, should your doctor determine that surgery is necessary:

Transthoracic Surgery

In transthoracic surgery, a surgeon will perform an incision on the left side of your chest, which will allow your stomach to return to its normal position. The total surgery time usually takes around four hours, including the pre- and post-operating procedures.1

Open Abdominal Surgery

In this method, the surgeon will make one large cut in your belly and insert a tube through it that will be lodged into your stomach to keep it in place. The tube can be removed after a week.2

Laparoscopic Repair

This procedure starts with making five quarter-inch incisions in your abdomen, where instruments and a small camera will be placed. The surgeon will then repair your hernia by placing organs back to their normal place.

Afterward, a new esophageal valve will be created by wrapping a 2-centimeter portion of your stomach to the lowest part of the esophagus. Then, this new valve will be anchored to the tough muscles of the diaphragm to reduce the chances of a hernia from reoccurring.3

Surgery for Infants With Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia

When a fetus is diagnosed with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH), tests are done to determine the severity of the condition. Those who have their livers herniating downward usually do not require any prenatal surgery, but will need to be under intensive observation for any potential problems once born.4

Fetuses who have digestive organs herniating upward in the chest have a lower survival rate, and will need to undergo a procedure called tracheal occlusion. In tracheal occlusion, a small balloon is placed in the trachea to help the lungs grow properly before the baby is born. This will help push the digestive organs downward as close to the normal position as possible upon birth.5

To perform the procedure, a very small incision is made inside the mother’s uterus and the balloon is inserted into the fetal trachea. As the baby grows, the balloon can then be removed and deflated to encourage normal fetal growth before the mother gives birth. Once born, the baby will need to be placed under intensive care to be observed for any potential complications.6

Risks of Hiatal Hernia Surgery

As with any method of invasive surgery, procedures done to fix hiatal hernia carry their own risks, such as the occurrence of a reflux. To prevent this, the surgeon may concurrently perform an anti-reflux procedure to reduce the occurrence of reflux and hernia altogether.7

There’s a chance for hiatal hernia to reoccur, but this doesn’t mean that the original operation was a failure. Rather, those who have large hiatal hernias tend to have increased chances of reoccurrence, simply because of the way their body is built.8

Other risks you need to watch out for after a hiatal hernia surgery are:9

Possible damage to the stomach, esophagus, liver or intestines (rarely)

Stomach bloating

Pain and difficulty swallowing

MORE ABOUT HIATAL HERNIA

Hiatal Hernia: Introduction

What Is Hiatal Hernia?

Hiatal Hernia Symptoms

Hiatal Hernia Causes

Hiatal Hernia Types

Hiatal Hernia Treatment

Hiatal Hernia Surgery

Hiatal Hernia Prevention

Hiatal Hernia Diet

Hiatal Hernia FAQ

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