Hypoglycemia Diet: What to Eat and What to Avoid

protein rich foods

Story at-a-glance -

  • A well-balanced diet is one of the most important factors in the maintenance of good health, with a special focus on getting all the essential vitamins and nutrients the body needs
  • If you’re currently suffering from low blood sugar, here are some of the foods you should consider adding to your daily meals

A well-balanced diet is one of the most important factors in the maintenance of good health, with a special focus on getting all the essential vitamins and nutrients your body needs. However, this emphasis on good diet is tripled if you’re struggling with your blood sugar levels.

What Foods Should You Eat and Avoid for Hypoglycemia?

Because of the numerous problems that can arise from too much or too little sugar in your diet, you might start getting confused as to what you’re supposed to eat or avoid. But the key is that hypoglycemia and other conditions that influence blood glucose only need a sense of balance for them to go away.

Following that logic, a perfect balance between sugars, carbohydrates, nutrients and minerals may be just what you need to start decreasing hypoglycemic episodes. If you’re currently suffering from low blood sugar, here are some of the foods you should consider adding to your daily meals:

Protein-rich foods: Protein and complex carbohydrates get broken down into glucose, but at a much slower pace than simple sugars. This helps the body achieve more consistent glucose levels.1 Eating protein-rich foods before going to bed also lowers the chances of getting a hypoglycemia attack during sleep. Some examples of protein-rich foods are grass fed beef, free-range organic poultry and wild-caught seafood .

Foods with soluble fiber. Fiber helps delay stomach emptying, digestion and sugar absorption. This helps keep sugar levels in the body at consistent levels and prevents hypoglycemia between meals.2 Foods high in fiber include chia seeds, cauliflower, broccoli and Brussels sprouts.

Low-glycemic index carbohydrates. It's best that you go for low-glycemic foods that will help normalize your sugar levels by releasing a steady supply of glucose.3 These include raw milk, beans and lentils. However, make sure that you prepare your beans and lentils properly (possibly fermented) to make sure that you eliminate their lectin content.

But while there are foods that can help you recover from hypoglycemia, there are also some that you have to limit or completely eliminate from your diet. These include:

Processed and refined carbohydrates: While it might be a good idea to eat a small amount of sweets or other foods filled with sugar during hypoglycemic episodes, eating simple carbohydrates throughout the day can help regulate the glucose in your body, and thereby help prevent a hypoglycemic episode.

That's because your body is able to transform and absorb these simple carbohydrates into glucose easily, raising blood sugar levels and triggering increased insulin release even hours after eating a meal.4

Alcohol: Avoid drinking any type of alcohol if you're affected by hypoglycemia. Alcohol is extremely harsh on the liver, the organ responsible for releasing glucose into your body. Excessive alcohol intake can cause blood sugar levels to drop by stimulating insulin secretion. Some types of alcohol may also contain high amounts of carbohydrates, which may raise blood sugar.5

Tips to Help You Deal With Hypoglycemia

To help you deal with or reduce your hypoglycemia attacks, here are a few tips that you can follow:

Never skip meals. While skipping meals may be a common practice among busy people, this doesn't mean that it's advisable for everyone. Skipping meals may upset your body's metabolism as your body will have to get energy from other sources aside from the food you eat. Skipping meals also adversely affects your glucose levels and aggravates hypoglycemia.

Avoid mixing up insulin medications. Diabetes patients often rely on insulin, and some may even use different insulin medications for different reasons. However, mixing them up is not advisable, and may even elicit a worse glycemic response by lowering your glucose levels too much or by failing to keep your levels at a constant number.

To keep yourself from taking the wrong medication at the wrong time, one technique is to store them in places where you would normally take the medication, such as keeping your mealtime insulin in the kitchen or the dining room and your long-acting insulin in the bedroom.6

Get enough sleep. Lack of sleep has numerous detrimental effects on glucose metabolism and hormone release.7 Make sure that you get about eight hours of sleep each night to give your body enough time to recover for another day of activities.

Be familiar with the 15/15 rule. The 15/15 rule refers to the process of eating 15 grams of carbohydrates when your blood sugar dips and waiting for 15 minutes to measure the glucose levels again. You repeat this process until your blood sugar reaches the normal range.8

MORE ABOUT HYPOGLYCEMIA

Hypoglycemia: Introduction

What Is Hypoglycemia?

Hypoglycemia Symptoms

Hypoglycemia Causes

Hypoglycemia Types

Hypoglycemia Treatment

Hypoglycemia Prevention

Hypoglycemia Diet

Hypoglycemia FAQ

< Previous

Hypoglycemia Prevention

Next >

Hypoglycemia FAQ

Click Here and be the first to comment on this article
Post your comment