Introduction to Kawasaki Disease: Discover About This Illness That Primarily Affects Children

inflamed skin

Story at-a-glance -

  • Today in the United States, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that 9 to 19 per 100,000 children are affected with Kawasaki disease. In 2000, around 4,248 hospitalizations due to Kawasaki disease were recorded among children and teens under 18 years old. Out of that number, 77 percent (3,277) were under the age of 5
  • Diagnosing for Kawasaki disease can be challenging because there are no tests made especially for this illness

Children are susceptible to different kinds of diseases that parents need to be aware of. Various factors are responsible for these illnesses, such as the environment the children live in, the strength of their immune system and their diet. Some child-centric conditions include:

Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) — Children who have a congenital heart condition, compromised immune system or chronic lung disease may develop bronchiolitis or pneumonia as a result of RSV.

Roseola — Kids age 2 and younger may get this condition. It causes high fever, congestion and coughing. After some time, a rash may appear on the chest and spread outward.

Fifth disease — Children 3 years old and below are most vulnerable to this disease. Symptoms include a bright-red rash on the cheeks, as well as a mild fever, runny nose and rash on the torso.1

Aside from these illnesses, children and parents need to be aware of a potentially fatal condition that may target their heart health: Kawasaki disease.

Kawasaki Disease  Affects a Child’s Cardiovascular System

Kawasaki disease is an illness of unknown origin that mainly affects children under the age of 5.2 Its symptoms are mainly related to inflammation, such as swollen lymph glands in the neck, as well as irritation and redness of the whites in the eyes. Lips, mouth and throat may be inflamed as well.3

Kawasaki disease was discovered by Dr. Tomisaku Kawasaki in 1961. From there, he published his research and gained recognition in the medical community, raising awareness for the illness.4 Today in the United States, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that 9 to 19 per 100,000 children are affected with Kawasaki disease. In 2000, around 4,248 hospitalizations due to Kawasaki disease were recorded among children and teens under 18 years old. Out of that number, 77 percent (3,277) were under the age of 5.5

Diagnosing for Kawasaki disease can be challenging because there are no tests made especially for this illness. Instead, diagnosis relies on ruling out other possible diseases before settling on Kawasaki disease. To facilitate this process, various tests are done, such as blood exams to identify characteristics of inflammation. Another one is imaging tests, which are used to look for possible damage in the cardiovascular system.6

Learn About Kawasaki Disease in This Guide

There is currently no available cure for Kawasaki disease. Instead, treatment is focused on managing the symptoms so that the patient is as comfortable as possible while letting the illness run its course.7 As a child recovers, they will have to be observed closely to prevent complications from causing permanent damage to their body. There’s a small chance that Kawasaki disease may even be fatal, which is why professional guidance is crucial.8

This guide aims to educate you about Kawasaki disease, such as its origins, diagnosis and treatments. If you discover any symptoms of Kawasaki disease in your child, don’t hesitate to visit a doctor immediately. Doing so may help increase their chances of recovery and avoiding permanent damage occur in their body.

MORE ABOUT KAWASAKI DISEASE

Kawasaki Disease: Introduction

What Is Kawasaki Disease?

Kawasaki Disease Symptoms

Kawasaki Disease Treatment

Kawasaki Disease Prevention

Kawasaki Disease Diet

Kawasaki Disease FAQ



Next >

What Is Kawasaki Disease?

Click Here and be the first to comment on this article
Post your comment