Frequently Asked Questions About Kidney Stones

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  • To dissolve kidney stones and release them from the body, natural treatments should be considered instead of conventional medicines
  • Kidney stones usually take 48 hours to pass on their own via the urinary tract, alongside ample fluid intake

Q: What do kidney stones look like?

A: Kidney stones are solid and sharp1 with a crystalline-like texture. These stones can be as small as a grain of sand, or as big as a pearl or golf ball.2,3 Kidney stones are typically yellow or brown, although tan, gold or black pieces could appear, too.4

Q: Can women get kidney stones?

A: Yes. Anyone can develop kidney stones. Women have a life incidence rate of kidney stones at 7 percent, which is lower compared to men with a 13 percent rate.5

Q: Can kidney stones cause a fever?

A: Fever is a common symptom among kidney stone patients with an infection, but these other indicators could be felt, too:6

Severe pain in the side and back and below the ribs

Pink, red, brown or cloudy or foul-smelling urine

Nausea and vomiting

Pain spreading to the lower abdomen and groin

Pain while urinating

Q: Can you die from kidney stones?

A: According to the American Urological Association (AUA), death because of kidney stones is rare, but there is a 28 percent rate of renal deterioration linked to certain stone types.7 However, kidney stone patients might have a significantly higher death risk if they treat their condition with morphine or other opioids,8 which can trigger substance abuse and lead to death.

Q: What treatment methods are effective for kidney stone pain relief?

A: To dissolve kidney stones and release them from the body, natural treatments should be considered instead of conventional medicines. Some of your best bets include water, sodium bicarbonate or baking soda, organic apple cider vinegar, basil, organic celery and pomegranate juice.9

Q: How long does it take to pass a kidney stone?

A: Kidney stones usually take 48 hours to pass on their own via the urinary tract, alongside ample fluid intake.10 If the stones don’t pass after this period, don’t fret, as these can move in a few days or up to several weeks.11 However, this timeframe might only apply to smaller kidney stones, since larger pieces may be difficult to pass and remain inside the body, causing pain.12

Q: How long does kidney stone removal surgery take?

A: The duration of a kidney stone removal surgery depends on the type of procedure that the patient will undergo. Shockwave lithotripsy (SWL) takes around 45 to 60 minutes,13 while a ureteroscopy lasts for one-and-a-half hours.14 Meanwhile, a percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) is done in three to four hours.15

MORE ABOUT KIDNEY STONES

Kidney Stones: Introduction

What Are Kidney Stones?

Kidney Stones Types

Kidney Stones Causes

Kidney Stones Symptoms

Kidney Stones Prevention

Kidney Stones Duration

Kidney Stones Treatment

Kidney Stones Surgery

Kidney Stones Diet

Kidney Stones FAQ

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[+]Sources and References [-]Sources and References

  • 1 “Definition & Facts for Kidney Stones,” National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, September 2016
  • 2 "Kidney Stones," Cleveland Clinic
  • 3 Crosta, “Kidney Stones: Causes, Symptoms and Treatments,” Medical News Today, January 9, 2017
  • 4 “Kidney Stones,” The Urology Team P.A.
  • 5 “How Common are Kidney Stones?” University of Wisconsin Health, June 28, 2013
  • 6 Mayo Clinic Staff, “Kidney Stones Symptoms,” Mayo Clinic, February 26, 2015
  • 7 “Kidney Stones,” Americal Urological Association, July 2016
  • 8 “Kidney Stones & Symptoms,” HealthEast
  • 9 Group, “10 Natural Remedies for Kidney Stones,” Global Healing Center, October 1, 2014
  • 10 Stöppler and Shiel, “Kidney Stones,” MedicineNet, November 4, 2015
  • 11 The Healthline Editorial Team and Marcin, “Passing a Kidney Stone at Home,” Healthline, June 24, 2016
  • 12 “Kidney Stones,” Harvard Health Publications, February 2013
  • 13 “Kidney Stone Treatment: Shock Wave Lithotripsy,” National Kidney Foundation, September 2009
  • 14 “Ureteroscopy,” UC San Diego Health
  • 15 “Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy (PCNL),” UF Department of Urology