'Is Lupus Hereditary?' and Similar Concerns

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  • Based on current evidence, genetics are thought to play a role in the development of lupus, but there are plenty of other factors to consider. Lupus can even form even if you have no twin or relatives that don't have any autoimmune disease
  • Studies among lupus patients with an identical twin have shown that there is a 25 percent chance for the other twin to catch lupus. For a lupus patient with a fraternal twin, there is a 2 to 3 percent chance for the other twin to get lupus

To some degree, lupus  can be considered a hereditary disease. Studies among lupus patients with an identical twin have shown that there is a 25 percent chance for the other twin to catch lupus. For a lupus patient with a fraternal twin, there is a 2 to 3 percent chance for the other twin to get lupus.1

Based on current evidence , genetics are thought to play a role in the development of lupus, but there are plenty of other factors to consider. Lupus can still  form even if you have no twin or relatives that don't have any autoimmune disease.

If you're undergoing a diagnosis for lupus, you should tell your doctor if you have a relative that a history of lupus or another autoimmune disease, because that information can help them immensely. It is also important to take note of all the symptoms  you have been experiencing to get a proper treatment plan .

Lupus Is NOT Contagious

Lupus is an autoimmune disease, meaning that there is a problem with how your immune system functions. Therefore, lupus does not involve viruses or bacteria that can spread to other people. You also can't transmit or contract lupus via sexual contact.2 It's actually possible to have children even if you have lupus. As an example, the pop singer Seal is diagnosed with discoid lupus but was able to father three healthy children.3

Women Have a Higher Risk, but Men Are in Danger Too

Women are two to four times more likely  of getting lupus than men, withthe highest incident rates occurring past the age of 40 years.4 There is no clear explanation why women have a higher risk factor, but it is theorized that the high amount of estrogen they produce triggers this illness.

While men have a lower risk of lupus, that doesn't mean they should be lax when it comes to their health. The same principle of healthy eating and proper exercise applies to them if they wish to reduce their risk of lupus.

Ethnicity Influences Your Chances of This Illness

Evidence has shown that your ethnicity can also influence your chances of getting lupus. Minority groups such as African-American, Hispanics, Asians, Native Americans, and Pacific Islanders such as Hawaiians have a higher chance of developing lupus than other ethnicities.5

Referencing the 1993 study “Lupus in Minorities: Nature Versus Nurture (LUMINA),” the S.L.E. Lupus Foundation notes that diseases as a result of lupus are also higher in minority groups, with African-American women and Latinas having a high chance of developing kidney disease.6

Again, there is no solid evidence as to why minority groups are more affected by lupus than other groups. If you belong to a minority group, you should take the statistics into consideration seriously and make the necessary changes to your lifestyle. In doing so, you can lower your risk of getting lupus and possibly other diseases.

MORE ABOUT LUPUS

Lupus: Introduction

What Is Lupus?

Lupus Types

Lupus Symptoms

Lupus Causes

Lupus Treatment

Lupus Remedies

Lupus Prevention

Lupus Diet

Is Lupus Hereditary?

Lupus Diagnosis

Living with Lupus

Lupus FAQ

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