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Head of CDC Admits on CNN That Vaccines Can Trigger Autism

Story at-a-glance -

  • In 1976, children received 10 vaccines before attending school, and in the early 1980s, the incidence of autism was 1 in 10,000 births. Today, it is 1 in 150 births and still climbing
  • While the CDC has admitted that vaccines can trigger autism, they were quick to say that it’s only in children with a “rare” mitochondrial disorder
  • After the discovery of one study linking autism to mitochondrial problems, some estimate the rate of mitochondrial dysfunction in autism to be 20 percent or more, and the rate among children with the regressive sub-type of autism is likely even higher
  • Health officials consider a vaccine to be safe if no bad reactions -- like seizures, intestinal obstruction, or anaphylaxis -- occur acutely. The CDC has not done any studies to assess the long-term effects of its immunization schedule
  • A suggested vaccine schedule for children is provided at the end of this article

Recently Julie Gerberding, the head of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), appeared on Dr. Sanjay Gupta's show House Call and explained that vaccines can trigger autism in a vulnerable subset of children. This is the claim that many parents have been making since at least the 1980s, and they have been dismissed and even mocked for making it.

The U.S. government has gone on the record saying that childhood vaccines can contribute to the symptoms of autism. They have then backtracked and stated that there is no association.


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