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The Simple Test Which May Help Prevent Autism

The Simple Test Which May Help Prevent Autism

Story at-a-glance -

  • A new hypothesis states that impaired glucose tolerance and hyperinsulinemia may be a common underlying mechanism of type 2 diabetes and autism
  • Emerging research also suggests strong links between gut flora and both diabetes and brain disorders such as autism. The primary key to maintaining both healthy gut flora and optimal insulin levels is a low-fructose, low-carb diet, high in nutrient-dense whole foods
  • Gut and Psychology Syndrome (GAPS) is the result of poorly developed or imbalanced gut flora, which can have a disastrous effect on mental health and brain development and function. Interestingly, children who do not develop normal gut flora from birth also appear to be particularly prone to vaccine damage, and this knowledge may be a MAJOR key for reducing vaccine injuries, including autism
  • GAPS can be easily identified within the first weeks of your baby's life by analyzing his stool to determine the state of his gut flora, and a urine test to check for metabolites. These tests will provide a picture of the state of your child's immune system. If your child has abnormal gut flora, he will be more prone to vaccine damage, so avoiding inoculations until the metabolic characteristics of GAPS have been reversed is highly recommended

By Dr. Mercola

A review of genetic and biochemical abnormalities has revealed a possible link between autism and type 2 diabetes. 


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