US Seafood Consumption Is Up, but Many Are Still Making Unhealthy Purchasing Choices

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January 07, 2017 | 355,434 views

Story at-a-glance

  • Americans increased their seafood consumption by nearly 1 pound per person in 2015, to an average of 15.5 pounds per year, or just over 4.75 ounces per week
  • That’s the largest increase in seafood consumption in two decades. However, we still fall short of dietary recommendations, which call for 8 ounces of seafood per week
  • Most would benefit from eating more fish, but be mindful of your choices. The healthiest and least risky in terms of contamination are wild-caught Alaskan salmon, sockeye salmon and smaller fish like anchovies, sardines, mackerel and herring

[+]Sources and References [-]Sources and References

  • 1 Fisheries of the United States Report 2015
  • 2 NPR October 31, 2016
  • 3 Environmental Research, Volume 110, Issue 3, April 2010, Pages 226–236
  • 4 Environmental Research, Volume 110, Issue 3, April 2010, Pages 226–236
  • 5 Mercury Policy Project, Mercury and Fish: The Facts
  • 6 Mercury Policy Project’s guide to mercury levels in different varieties of fish and shellfish (PDF)
  • 7 Investigate West March 10, 2015
  • 8 Consumer Reports April 24, 2015
  • 9 Seafood Watch, Sustainable Seafood Search
  • 10 Seafood Watch App