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Even a Mild Head Injury Increases Your Risk for Parkinson's Disease

head injury

Story at-a-glance -

  • The accumulation of mild head trauma over time has been shown to raise your risk for neurological dysfunction later in life. This includes not only Alzheimer’s but also another neurodegenerative process, Parkinson’s disease
  • According to recent research, even a single concussion could increase your risk for Parkinson’s by 56 to 83 percent, depending on the severity of the injury
  • Those with one or more TBIs in their past also received a diagnosis of Parkinson’s on average two years earlier compared to those who had never had a TBI
  • Telltale signs of TBI include poor concentration, mood changes, irritability, changes in your ability to focus and follow through on mental tasks, poor word recall, foggy thinking and sleep problems
  • Commonsense strategies that will lower your risk of suffering a TBI are discussed, as are helpful treatment aids that will facilitate brain healing

By Dr. Mercola

According to some estimates, as many as 90 percent of the population have experienced some form of traumatic brain injury (TBI), be it from a car accident, slip and fall incident or simply hitting your head on a cabinet. Unfortunately, most go undiagnosed and untreated, and the accumulation of low-grade concussions over time has been shown to raise your risk for neurological dysfunction later in life. This includes not only Alzheimer's but also Parkinson's disease.


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