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Garlic Is a Great Blood Thinner

Analysis by Dr. Joseph Mercola

Story at-a-glance -

  • Studies indicate that people who eat as little as a quarter-teaspoon of garlic powder per day appear to have less aortic stiffness, which is good for anyone wanting to avoid cardiovascular problems such as stroke
  • One expert notes that the “antiplatelet aggregation” activity of garlic, as well as onions to a lesser degree, goes by the wayside when it’s cooked, but there are ways to change that outcome
  • Raw garlic appears to be around 13 times more potent as a blood thinner than raw onions or cooked garlic; crushing it and waiting 10 minutes before cooking it activates the enzyme that releases the antiplatelet compounds
  • High concentrations of sulfur and allicin compounds also impart benefits related to heart health, as well as fight harmful bacteria, inflammation, intestinal infections, yeast infections and diseases associated with carcinogens

As you age, your arteries stiffen and continue doing so over time. It happens to virtually everyone to varying degrees, a 2012 study observes, and leads to more frequent physiological problems related to poor blood circulation, including an increased risk of renal impairment — renal being the organs involving your kidneys, bladder and urethra, the system that regulates the passage, storage and elimination of urine — as well as stroke.

In 2013, researchers reported following a meta-analysis on the effects of garlic on serum lipids that garlic consumption may help optimize cholesterol levels, leading to a reduced risk of coronary events.


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