What Causes Spinal Stenosis?

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  • Spinal stenosis may be caused by numerous skeletal conditions and disorders that may lead to the compression of the spinal cord
  • Spinal stenosis can be triggered or aggravated by your lifestyle choices. If you take part in activities that negatively affect your overall health, there is a chance that you’re paving the way for the development of diseases

There is no one way on how a person can get spinal stenosis because of the various mechanisms that contribute to its development. Each person has an equal chance of developing this spinal disorder, especially if they’re at the age when bone deterioration starts.

Other Diseases and Disorders Can Lead to Spinal Stenosis

Spinal stenosis may be caused by numerous skeletal conditions and disorders that may lead to the compression of the spinal cord. Some of these include:

  • Osteoarthritis. Osteoarthritis is the most common age-related joint disorder in the world’s population, affecting about 30 million adults in the U.S. alone.1 The bone deterioration caused by osteoarthritis leads to the development of bone spurs, which are bony projections that develop between joints. In the spine, these bone spurs are usually found in the spinal canal, eventually pinching the spinal cord.2
  • Degenerative Adult Scoliosis. This refers to the gradual curving of the spine caused by aging and degeneration. The eventual bone wasting causes the abnormal “sagging” of the spine because of its inability to properly support the body. Bone spurs also eventually develop, taking up a considerable amount of the spinal canal, cutting off the oxygen and blood circulation in the nerves and causing spinal stenosis.3
  • Tumors. The abnormal growth in tissues can lead to the development of tumors inside or outside the spine. Some of the most common types of spinal tumors include osteoblastoma, osteosarcoma, chondrosarcoma and multiple myeloma. When the growth is not contained, it eventually starts pushing on the spinal cord.4
  • Achondroplasia is an abnormality in bone development, leading to abnormally shaped bones and a shorter bone structure. Because of the limitation in bone development, the spine is unable to grow to its right size, providing the spinal cord with less room. This is one of the forms of congenital spinal stenosis, wherein patients are born with a strong predisposition for this condition.5

Lifestyle Factors That Can Cause Spinal Stenosis

Spinal stenosis can be triggered or aggravated by your lifestyle choices. If you take part in activities that negatively affect your overall health, there is a chance that you’re paving the way for the development of diseases and disorders in the latter part of your life. Here are some of the factors that influence the occurrence of spinal stenosis:

  • Having a sedentary lifestyle. People who sit at a desk for hours on end, such as office workers, minimize their body’s ability to employ the wide range of motion it needs for optimal function. A sedentary lifestyle can influence both muscle and bone health by leading to premature degeneration.6
  • Smoking. Tobacco use has been linked to numerous health repercussions, mainly affecting the brain and the lungs. Smoking can also contribute to bone wasting because of the damage it does to your cells. It increases your risk of developing osteoporosis and damaging your intervertebral discs, which can lead to spinal stenosis.7
  • Obesity. Excessive fat in the body can cause increased pressure on the spine due to the extra weight it has to support. Studies also suggest that overweight people have a higher susceptibility to osteoporosis, osteoarthritis and other skeletal disorders, which may lead to spinal stenosis.8

MORE ABOUT SPINAL STENOSIS

Spinal Stenosis:Introduction

What Is Spinal Stenosis?

Spinal Stenosis Symptoms

Spinal Stenosis Causes

Types of Spinal Stenosis

Spinal Stenosis Treatment

Spinal Stenosis Surgeries

Spinal Stenosis Prevention

Spinal Stenosis Exercises

Spinal Stenosis Diet

Spinal Stenosis FAQ

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