Frequently Asked Questions About Spinal Stenosis

Frequently Asked Questions About Spinal Stenosis

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  • Central spinal stenosis refers to the compression of the spinal cord in the central part of the vertebral column, which causes nerve inflammation and weakness
  • Spinal stenosis is caused by the narrowing of the spinal canal, causing the spinal cord to become constricted because of the increasing pressure applied by the joints surrounding it
  • The conventional treatment for spinal stenosis usually consists of anti-inflammatories and pain medication. Surgery may also be considered for people with severe cases of spinal stenosis

Q: What is central spinal canal stenosis?

A: Central spinal stenosis refers to the compression of the spinal cord in the central part of the vertebral column, which causes nerve inflammation and weakness. This type of spinal stenosis can also cause the compression of the cauda equina nerve roots, which are responsible for receiving and sending out messages from the lower extremities.1

Q: What causes spinal stenosis?

A: Spinal stenosis is caused by the narrowing of the spinal canal, prompting the spinal cord to become constricted because of the increasing pressure applied by the joints surrounding it. It may be caused by the degeneration of the bones through aging, arthritis, bone overgrowth and spinal injury.2

Q: Is spinal stenosis hereditary?

A: People who belong to families with a history of spinal stenosis have a higher risk of developing this condition due to its genetic trait. However, having a relative with spinal stenosis does not mean there’s a 100 percent chance that you’ll develop this condition.3

Q: Is spinal stenosis deadly?

A: In rare cases, spinal stenosis may be fatal, especially when caused by accidents and severe injuries. This is because the excessive pressure on the spinal cord will cause nerve damage and eventual nerve death.4

Q: Can spinal stenosis affect your bladder?

A: In severe cases, this condition can cause difficulty in controlling the lower part of the body, including both the bowel and the bladder. This may lead to urinary and fecal incontinence.

Q: What are the symptoms of spinal stenosis?

A: The primary symptom of spinal stenosis is numbness or pain that emanates from the lower back down to your toes. This leg pain is often intensified when walking, and can go away when seated. Other symptoms may include loss of lower body control and even bladder control.5

Q: How is spinal stenosis diagnosed?

A: Spinal stenosis can be diagnosed through numerous physical examinations and screening procedures. Health experts usually do examinations that measure motor and sensory function and gait. MRIs and X-rays may also be done to locate the spinal compression.6

Q: Is there a cure for spinal stenosis?

A: No, there is no known cure for spinal stenosis. However, health practitioners may recommend that you partake in exercises and stretches to alleviate its symptoms.

There is the option of undergoing spinal surgery to relieve the compression on the spinal cord. However, surgery may come with other risks and complications. There are also alternative and homeopathic treatments that can alleviate the symptoms, making it easier for you to deal with its symptoms.

Q: How do you treat spinal stenosis?

A: The conventional treatment for spinal stenosis usually consists of anti-inflammatories and pain medication. Surgery may also be considered for people with severe cases of spinal stenosis. However, there are also safer homeopathic treatments that you may try. Some of these include acupuncture, physical therapy and herbal treatment.

Q: Can corrective surgery for spinal stenosis cause paralysis?

A: Spinal decompression poses multiple possible complications because of the sensitive mechanism of the procedure. Some of the risks include nerve root damage, infections and cerebrospinal fluid leak, which can lead to paralysis. While it rarely occurs, spinal decompression can lead to lower body paralysis, especially if the spinal cord is damaged during the operation. This risk is also doubled when the patient is taking blood thinners as medication for pre-existing conditions.7

MORE ABOUT SPINAL STENOSIS

Spinal Stenosis:Introduction

What Is Spinal Stenosis?

Spinal Stenosis Symptoms

Spinal Stenosis Causes

Types of Spinal Stenosis

Spinal Stenosis Treatment

Spinal Stenosis Surgeries

Spinal Stenosis Prevention

Spinal Stenosis Exercises

Spinal Stenosis Diet

Spinal Stenosis FAQ


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