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Frequently Asked Questions About Staph Infections

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  • Although a staph infection does not increase the risk for birth defects, premature birth or a miscarriage, the symptoms need to be treated right away, as they can be painful and uncomfortable for the mother
  • Staph infections are caused by only one strain of bacteria, which is Staphylococcus aureus

Q: How do you get rid of a staph infection?

A: Staph infections are common, but can be treated by readily accessible home remedies. Popular choices include tea tree oil, apple cider vinegar and turmeric.1 Visit the Treatments page to learn how you can apply these home remedies for different staph infections.

Q: How do staph infections occur after surgery?

A: Patients who are recovering from surgery are highly susceptible to hospital-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (HA-MRSA). This normally occurs because of a prolonged stay in the hospital.2

You can get HA-MRSA through various ways. Hospital personnel may carry MRSA bacteria, allowing the microbes to enter your surgical incisions. They may also enter through intravenous devices like urinary catheters.3

Q: Does a staph infection itch?

A: Certain staph infections can cause itchiness, such as impetigo and folliculitis. The itchy area is usually caused by rashes as a result of the bacterial infection.4 Other staph infections may not be itchy, but are marked with pain and swelling instead.

Q: Can a staph infection occur in babies?

A: Yes, babies are also highly susceptible to staph infections. One common occurrence is neonatal conjunctivitis, which is the medical term for pink eye in newborn children.5 It produces a pus-like discharge, along with swelling and itchiness in the eyes.

Q: What are the early signs of a staph infection?

A: The signs of a staph infection vary and can depend on what kind of infection will develop. Boils for example, start out as small red bumps that become swollen and painful. Impetigo usually starts as a small rash that quickly spreads and eventually develops blisters.6

Q: How does a staph infection develop while you’re pregnant?

A: A staph infection during pregnancy develops just like any other typical staph infection. The expectant mother may develop a boil, folliculitis or cellulitis. Although a staph infection does not increase the risk for birth defects, premature birth or a miscarriage, the symptoms need to be treated right away, as they can be painful and uncomfortable for the mother.

Q: What are the different strains of a staph infection?

A: Staph infections are caused by only one strain of bacteria, which is Staphylococcus aureus. However, there is a more dangerous subtype, called methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). This variant is resistant to several types of antibiotics, making it difficult for medical professionals to treat patients affected with this strain.7

Q: Can a staph infection kill you?

A: Yes, it’s possible for a staph infection to become fatal if the bacteria enter the bloodstream. There are several invasive staph infections, all of which can be fatal:8

Sepsis: Also known as blood poisoning, sepsis induces fever, fast heartbeat and low blood pressure.

Toxic shock syndrome: A more severe form of sepsis, it can cause high fever, a sudden and dramatic drop in blood pressure, dizziness and confusion.

Septic arthritis: This occurs when staph bacteria infect a joint or several joints, causing swelling, pain and fever.

Endocarditis: This is an inflammation of the internal heart muscles. Symptoms include chest pain, fatigue, coughing, short breaths, fever and unexplained weight loss.

MORE ABOUT STAPH INFECTION

Staph Infection: Introduction

What Is Staph Infection?

Staph Infection In Children

Is Staph Infection Contagious?

Staph Infection Duration

Staph Infection Causes

Staph Infection Types

Staph Infection Symptoms

Staph Infection Treatment

Staph Infection Prevention

Staph Infection Diet

Staph Infection FAQ

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[+] Sources and References [-] Sources and References

  • 1 Top 10 Home Remedies, “Home Remedies for Staph Infection”
  • 2, 7 Mayo Clinic, “MRSA Infection — Definition”
  • 3 NHS Choices, “MRSA Infection — Introduction”
  • 4 Staph Infection Resources, “Symptoms of MRSA and Staph Infections”
  • 5 Medscape, “Neonatal Conjunctivitis”
  • 6 Mayo Clinic, “Staph Infections — Symptoms”
  • 8 YourGenome.org, “What Are Staphylococcal Infections?”
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