Ginger Tea: An Ancient Solution to Today’s Common Ailments

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  • Ginger (Zingiber officinale) is one the oldest cultivated plants currently in existence. Historians believe that ginger has been grown for more 5,000 years, ever since ancient Indians and Chinese discovered and used it as a tonic root to help treat a variety of ailments
  • Ginger is a caffeine- and sugar-free plant that contains a mixture of vitamins and minerals working together to benefit your health. Furthermore, when made into tea, ginger releases gingerol and protease, which are compounds that may help boost cardiovascular circulation

Ginger (Zingiber officinale) is one the oldest cultivated plants currently in existence. Historians believe that ginger has been grown for more 5,000 years, ever since ancient Indians and Chinese discovered and used it as a tonic root to help treat a variety of ailments. Afterwards, the plant was introduced to the Western world when it was exported from India to the Roman Empire.1

Back then, ginger was considered to be an incredibly luxurious spice and was difficult to procure. During the 13th and 14th century A.D., however, Arab traders planted ginger roots throughout their voyage in Africa, causing the plant to spread and prices to go down. Today, ginger can be purchased easily almost anywhere compared to hundreds of years ago, where the price for a single pound of it was equivalent to a single live sheep!

What Is Ginger Tea and Why Should You Take It?

One easy way of obtaining ginger’s advantages is making your own ginger root tea, and it is actually one of the oldest methods as well. In its simplest sense, ginger tea is made by boiling sliced ginger root in water. During the 16th century, herbalists prescribed this solution to the upper classes of society because they were prone to overindulging that led to stomach problems.2

Today, the tea can be made conveniently using ginger tea powder or teabags bought from online shops, such as Amazon.3 If this is your preferred method, make sure that the product you’re buying uses high-quality ingredients from a reputable company. But if you have the time and resources, I strongly suggest growing your own ginger roots because this approach is healthier and safer, too.

The Potential Benefits of Ginger Tea Are Numerous

What is ginger tea good for anyway? Throughout history, it has been prescribed by healers and herbalists to help their patients alleviate a variety of conditions. Drinking it regularly may help:4

Relieve Nausea

If you always feel nauseous while traveling, drinking ginger tea beforehand may help prevent the symptom from appearing. A cup at the first sign of nausea may also help provide relief.

Promote Stomach Health

Drinking ginger tea often may help boost stomach health and reduce bloating by improving your digestion.

Manage Inflammation

Ginger’s anti-inflammatory properties are well-known throughout history. Taking it as tea may help you remedy muscle and joint pain after a strenuous workout.

Ease Respiratory Conditions

Ginger tea may help relieve inflammation that normally occurs because of various respiratory diseases such as colds, allowing you to breathe better.

Boost Blood Circulation

The various nutrients in ginger tea work together to help improve blood circulation. In addition, your risk of developing clogged arteries may also decrease.

Relieve Menstrual Discomfort

The muscle-relaxing properties of ginger tea may help provide relief for women suffering from menstrual cramps.

Strengthen the Immune System

The numerous antioxidants found in ginger tea may help boost your immune system, thereby helping reduce your risk of contracting infectious diseases.

Alleviate Stress

The aroma and soothing qualities of ginger tea may help give you peace of mind after a stressful day.

Ginger tea may also be further improved by adding other ingredients. For example, adding lemon into the recipe may help:5

Caffeine Content and Other Nutrition Facts of Ginger Tea

Ginger is a caffeine- and sugar-free plant that contains a mixture of vitamins and minerals working together to benefit your health. Furthermore, when made into tea, ginger releases gingerol and protease, which are compounds that may help boost cardiovascular circulation. Here are some of the nutrients you can get from ginger tea:

Ginger Tea Nutrition Facts

Serving Size: 1 teacup (180 ml)
  Amt. Per
Serving
Kilojoules 1 kj
Calories 5
Protein 0.07 g
Fat 0.04 g
Saturated Fat 0.011 g
Polyunsaturated Fat 0.012 g
Monounsaturated Fat 0.007 g
Cholesterol 0 mg
Total Carbohydrates 1.16 g
Sugar 0.05 g
Fiber 0 g
Sodium 5 g

How to Make Ginger Tea in Your Home

Making high-quality ginger tea starts at the beginning: the plant itself. Start by making sure your garden has rich, loose soil with lots of shade. Next, choose an organic ginger root from a reputable grower, as this is what you will need to place into the ground. Ideally, it should be around 4 to 5 inches long with several fingers that have greenish tips.6

Plant the root in early spring after the last frost has passed. Next, cut off the fingers and place them in a shallow trench no deeper than 1 inch.7 Once the roots are firmly placed in the ground, water them thoroughly, and leaves will emerge within a week or two. After you’ve reached this phase, continue watering, but sparingly. Overall, it may take 10 months for the plants to completely mature.8

Harvesting the plants is easy, as you only need to lift them gently from the soil. If you want to replant a new batch, simply break off a part of a root that has foliage and then return it into the ground. Wash the remaining bunch thoroughly with running water,9 and then store them in a reusable plastic bag with the air vacuumed, then place it into your refrigerator’s crisper.10

Go Ahead and Give This Ginger Tea Recipe a Try

Once you have your own ginger garden, you can now proceed to making fresh ginger tea. It’s quite easy to make, ensuring that it’ll be a regular fixture in your diet for years to come.

Ginger Tea Recipe

Ingredients:

  • 2 inches of raw ginger
  • 1 and a half or 2 cups of water11

Procedure:

  1. Peel the ginger root and slice it thinly to maximize the amount of the plant you can use.
  2. Boil the slices in filtered water for 10 minutes. If you want a stronger and tangier flavor, boil for 20 minutes, as well as adding more ginger.
  3. Turn off the heat, then let the tea simmer.
  4. Add fresh lime juice and/or raw honey if you want to modify the flavor.
  5. Enjoy your tea!

Turmeric-Ginger Tea12

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups of water
  • 1/2 teaspoon of ground turmeric
  • 1/2 teaspoon of chopped fresh ginger
  • 1 tablespoon of raw honey
  • 1 lemon wedge
  • 1/2 teaspoon of ground cinnamon (optional)

Procedure:

  1. Mix all ingredients together and boil the water on medium low heat for 10 minutes then Strain into a cup.13

Side Effects of Ginger Tea Are Virtually Nonexistent

The great thing about ginger tea is that it is safe to drink, and no serious side effects have been reported. However, there’s a possibility that you may develop heartburn or an upset stomach, so watch out for these whenever you drink ginger tea. You might mistake this for a ginger allergy, but this typically isn’t the case. A rash generally indicates an allergy, and should this happen when you drink the tea, stop immediately and visit a doctor.14

Adding Ginger Tea to Your Regular Diet Can Help You Achieve Optimal Health

Ginger has been around for thousands of years, and it’s safe to say it’s not going anywhere soon. Based on the evidence, taking it as a tea may potentially benefit your well-being in the long run. But in order to maximize its effectiveness, I recommend that you grow your own ginger roots so that you avoid ingesting pesticides and other harmful chemicals that normally come from conventionally grown herbs.

Frequently Asked Questions About Ginger Tea

Q: Is ginger tea good for you?

A: Ginger tea may benefit your health, as it is known for helping relieve nausea and stomach problems, manage inflammation, improve blood circulation and strengthen your immune system.15

Q: Is ginger tea safe to take during pregnancy?

A: There’s currently little data about drinking ginger tea during pregnancy, but the American Pregnancy Association considers it possibly safe.16

Q: Where can you buy ginger tea?

A: Ginger tea bags are available at the grocery store, but it is better to make your own tea using ginger roots grown from your garden.17

[+]Sources and References [-]Sources and References

  • 1 Mother Earth Living, March 16, 2011
  • 2, 15 MDidea.com. “Origin and Narrative History of Ginger, Traditional and Current Uses”
  • 3 Amazon, “Organic Ginger Tea”
  • 4 The Times of India, August 11, 2017
  • 5 Organic Facts, “9 Amazing Benefits of Lemon Ginger Tea”
  • 6, 7, 8, 9 Gardening Know How, “Growing Ginger Plants: How to Plant and Care for Ginger”
  • 10 Kitchn, January 7, 2015
  • 11 The Spruce, “How to Make Homemade Ginger Tea (Recipe)”
  • 12  AllRecipes, “Ginger-Turmeric Herbal Tea”
  • 13, 14 Healthline, “Does Ginger Tea Have Bad Side Effects?”
  • 16 American Pregnancy Association, “Herbal Tea and Pregnancy”
  • 17 SFGate, “What Does Ginger Tea Do for You?”