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Mushrooms: Your Newest Vitamin D Source

May 06, 2006 | 20,495 views
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New research suggests that exposure to ultraviolet light could enrich growing or just-picked mushrooms with a large supply of vitamin D. This could be good news for those who do not eat fish or drink fortified milk, which are currently the major food sources of the vitamin.

Better Than Cod Liver Oil?

A single serving of white button mushrooms could contain almost nine times the daily value of vitamin D after exposure to only five minutes of UV light. This would make it a richer source than two tablespoons of cod liver oil, one of the best current sources of the vitamin.

Currently, Mushrooms Not Exposed

Current practice is to raise mushrooms indoors in the dark, which minimizes their contact with UV light; therefore, they presently contain only minimal amounts of vitamin D.

Osteoporosis, Heart Disease, Cancer

Vitamin D deficiency has been connected to osteoporosis, cardiovascular disease, and tooth loss, and an increased mortality rate for several kinds of cancer.

 

 

 

Dr. Mercola's Comments:

 

Since 85 percent of the U.S. population is deficient in vitamin D (primarily due to misleading information from conventional health "experts" that created a sun phobia, or because they are just not making enough effort to regularly get outside) this news about mushrooms becoming a new source for vitamin D would, at face value, seem like good news.

And it probably is good news for most people, as it would be the rare person that would eat too many of these vitamin D mushrooms. But it is certainly possible to overdose on vitamin D.

It is my strong recommendation that anyone taking regular oral vitamin D, should have their blood levels checked.

You really need to be careful about all forms of oral vitamin D as it is just too easy to overdose. I had this personally confirmed this winter when I spent two months away from Chicago in a sub-tropical setting and had regular sun exposure nearly every day.

Prior to leaving, my levels were fine. When I returned, however, my vitamin D levels were in the toxic range. I believe this was related to the fact that I was taking cod liver oil for two months prior to leaving.

I probably would have been fine, as I have been in past winters, if I wasn't getting so much sun exposure.

Fortunately, elevated vitamin D from sun exposure drops relatively rapidly, but I have stopped taking cod liver oil.

The bottom line here: Get your vitamin D from sun exposure. If you choose to take a vitamin D supplement. Make sure it's a high quality D3, not D2, and have your blood levels checked a few times to make sure your vitamin D levels are within the healthy range, and you don't exceed the beneficial dosage.

 

 

 


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